Sep
21
8:00 PM20:00

DC: Mortified at the Black Cat

The wildly popular Mortified stars everyday adults sharing their most embarrassingly real teenage diary entries, poems, love letters, lyrics and locker notes ... in front of total strangers.

Hailed a "cultural phenomenon" by Newsweek and celebrated by This American Life, Entertainment Weekly, Time, Wired, The AV Club, The Today Show (twice), and beyond, Mortified celebrates stories revealed through the strange and extraordinary things we created as teens. 

Since 2002, Mortified has been curating teen angst artifacts from people like you. The project began when founder David Nadelberg discovered an unsent love letter he wrote us as a teenager. The letter sparked an idea and he sent an email to friends asking if anyone wanted to share their childhood writings on stage. That email went viral and soon, responses poured in from strangers near and far. Over a decade later, what started with a single letter transformed into a movement that included a range of participants (ad execs, architects, stand-ups, salesmen, writers, receptionists, actors, and attorneys) excited to "share the shame" from LA to DC to Amsterdam. We encourage people everywhere - even those with no interest in appearing on stage - to unearth the strange stuff they created as kids and share them with at least one person. You'd be surprised what you discover in the process.

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Sep
22
6:00 PM18:00

Baltimore: Mortified at Creative Alliance

SAT SEP 22 | 6PM & 9PM | $20, $17 Members (+$3 At the door)

The wildly popular Mortified, produced by Alex Hewett and Adam Ruben, stars everyday adults sharing their most embarrassingly real teenage diary entries, poems, love letters, lyrics and locker notes ... in front of total strangers.

Hailed a "cultural phenomenon" by Newsweek and celebrated by This American Life, Entertainment Weekly, Time, Wired, The AV Club, The Today Show (twice), and beyond, Mortified celebrates stories revealed through the strange and extraordinary things we created as teens. 

Since 2002, Mortified has been curating teen angst artifacts from people like you. The project began when founder David Nadelberg discovered an unsent love letter he wrote us as a teenager. The letter sparked an idea and he sent an email to friends asking if anyone wanted to share their childhood writings on stage. That email went viral and soon, responses poured in from strangers near and far. Over a decade later, what started with a single letter transformed into a movement that included a range of participants (ad execs, architects, stand-ups, salesmen, writers, receptionists, actors, and attorneys) excited to "share the shame" from LA to DC to Amsterdam. We encourage people everywhere - even those with no interest in appearing on stage - to unearth the strange stuff they created as kids and share them with at least one person. You'd be surprised what you discover in the process.

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Oct
11
6:30 PM18:30

Chico: Friends of the Library reading and book signing

In an “eye-opening memoir” (People) “as beautiful as it is discomfiting” (The New Yorker), award-winning writer Apricot Irving untangles her youth on a missionary compound in Haiti.

Apricot Irving grew up as a missionary’s daughter in Haiti. Her father was an agronomist, a man who hiked alone into the deforested hills to preach the gospel of trees. Her mother and sisters spent their days in the confines of the hospital compound they called home. As a child, this felt like paradise to Irving; as a teenager, it became a prison. Outside of the walls of the missionary enclave, Haiti was a tumult of bugle-call bus horns and bicycles that jangled over hard-packed dirt, road blocks and burning tires triggered by political upheaval, the clatter of rain across tin roofs, and the swell of voices running ahead of the storm.

Poignant and explosive, Irving weaves a portrait of a missionary family that is unflinchingly honest: her father’s unswerving commitment to his mission, her mother’s misgivings about his loyalty, the brutal history of colonization. Drawing from research, interviews, and journals—her parents’ as well as her own—this memoir in many voices evokes a fractured family finding their way to kindness through honesty.

Told against the backdrop of Haiti’s long history of intervention, it grapples with the complicated legacy of those who wish to improve the world, while bearing witness to the defiant beauty of an undefeated country. A lyrical meditation on trees and why they matter, loss and privilege, love and failure. The Gospel of Trees is a “lush, emotional debut...A beautiful memoir that shows how a family altered by its own ambitious philanthropy might ultimately find hope in their faith and love for each other, and for Haiti.” (Publishers Weekly, starred review).

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Oct
16
6:00 PM18:00

New Orleans: Reading and conversation with Lavinia Spalding

Tuesday, October 16th

6-7:30PM

Join us with Apricot Irving in conversation with Lavinia Spalding discussing her book, The Gospel of Trees. Apricot will sign books after the discussion.

In an “eye-opening memoir” (People) “as beautiful as it is discomfiting” (The New Yorker), award-winning writer Apricot Irving untangles her youth on a missionary compound in Haiti.

Apricot Irving grew up as a missionary’s daughter in Haiti. Her father was an agronomist, a man who hiked alone into the deforested hills to preach the gospel of trees. Her mother and sisters spent their days in the confines of the hospital compound they called home. As a child, this felt like paradise to Irving; as a teenager, it became a prison. Outside of the walls of the missionary enclave, Haiti was a tumult of bugle-call bus horns and bicycles that jangled over hard-packed dirt, road blocks and burning tires triggered by political upheaval, the clatter of rain across tin roofs, and the swell of voices running ahead of the storm.

Poignant and explosive, Irving weaves a portrait of a missionary family that is unflinchingly honest: her father’s unswerving commitment to his mission, her mother’s misgivings about his loyalty, the brutal history of colonization. Drawing from research, interviews, and journals—her parents’ as well as her own—this memoir in many voices evokes a fractured family finding their way to kindness through honesty.

Told against the backdrop of Haiti’s long history of intervention, it grapples with the complicated legacy of those who wish to improve the world, while bearing witness to the defiant beauty of an undefeated country. A lyrical meditation on trees and why they matter, loss and privilege, love and failure. The Gospel of Trees is a “lush, emotional debut...A beautiful memoir that shows how a family altered by its own ambitious philanthropy might ultimately find hope in their faith and love for each other, and for Haiti.” (Publishers Weekly, starred review).

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Portland Book Festival 2018
Nov
10
10:00 AM10:00

Portland Book Festival 2018

I'm looking forward to spending the weekend in the company of these fabulous fellow writers.

The 2018 Portland Book Festival will feature 100+ authors presenting on 9 stagespop-up readings throughout the Portland Art Museum galleries, and 13 writing workshops. The festival includes activities for readers of all ages, an extensive book fair with 80+ vendorslocal food trucks, and partner events all weekend long.

Join us at the Portland Art Museum, First Congregational United Church of ChristThe Old ChurchOregon Historical SocietyNorthwest Film Center, and three of the Portland’5 stages: the Brunish Theatre, the Winningstad Theatre, and the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall.

The official independent booksellers for the 2018 Portland Book Festival are Powell’s BooksGreen Bean BooksBroadway Books, and Annie Bloom’s Books.

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Sep
18
6:00 PM18:00

Asheville: Reading and book signing at Malaprop's Bookstore

In an “eye-opening memoir” (People) “as beautiful as it is discomfiting” (The New Yorker), award-winning writer Apricot Irving untangles her youth on a missionary compound in Haiti.

Apricot Irving grew up as a missionary’s daughter in Haiti. Her father was an agronomist, a man who hiked alone into the deforested hills to preach the gospel of trees. Her mother and sisters spent their days in the confines of the hospital compound they called home. As a child, this felt like paradise to Irving; as a teenager, it became a prison. Outside of the walls of the missionary enclave, Haiti was a tumult of bugle-call bus horns and bicycles that jangled over hard-packed dirt, road blocks and burning tires triggered by political upheaval, the clatter of rain across tin roofs, and the swell of voices running ahead of the storm.

Poignant and explosive, Irving weaves a portrait of a missionary family that is unflinchingly honest: her father’s unswerving commitment to his mission, her mother’s misgivings about his loyalty, the brutal history of colonization. Drawing from research, interviews, and journals—her parents’ as well as her own—this memoir in many voices evokes a fractured family finding their way to kindness through honesty.

Told against the backdrop of Haiti’s long history of intervention, it grapples with the complicated legacy of those who wish to improve the world, while bearing witness to the defiant beauty of an undefeated country. A lyrical meditation on trees and why they matter, loss and privilege, love and failure. The Gospel of Trees is a “lush, emotional debut...A beautiful memoir that shows how a family altered by its own ambitious philanthropy might ultimately find hope in their faith and love for each other, and for Haiti.” (Publishers Weekly, starred review).

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Sep
16
2:00 PM14:00

Durham, NC: Reading and conversation with Krista Bremer

  • Barnes & Noble at New Hope Commons (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A reading from The Gospel of Trees and a conversation with Krista Bremer, fellow Rona Jaffe Writers' Awards recipient and associate publisher at The Sun magazine, author of A Tender Struggle.

Fifteen years ago, Krista Bremer, a California-bred feminist, surfer, and aspiring journalist, met Ismail Suayah, sincere, passionate, kind, yet from a very different world. One of eight siblings born in an impoverished fishing village in Libya, Ismail was raised a Muslim—and his faith informed his life. When Krista and Ismail made the decision to become a family, she embarked on a journey she never could have imagined, an accidental jihad: a quest for spiritual and intellectual growth that would open her mind and, more important, her heart.

Apricot Irving grew up as a missionary’s daughter in Haiti. Her father was an agronomist, a man who hiked alone into the hills with a macouti of seeds to preach the gospel of trees. Beautiful, poignant, and explosive, The Gospel of Trees is the story of a family crushed by ideals, and restored to kindness by honesty. Told against the backdrop of Haiti’s long history of intervention—often unwelcome—it grapples with the complicated legacy of those who wish to improve the world. Drawing from family letters, cassette tapes, journals, and interviews, it is an exploration of missionary culpability and idealism, told from within.

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Sep
12
7:00 PM19:00

NYC: Rona Jaffe Foundation reading with the Brooklyn Book Festival

Wednesday, September 12, 2018, 7 p.m.
KGB Bar Red Room-Admission Free

85 East 4th Street NYC

Ama Codjoe was raised in Youngstown, Ohio, with roots in Memphis and Accra. She has been awarded support from the Saltonstall and Cave Canem Foundations, Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, and MacDowell Colony. Her recent poems have appeared in Callaloo, Virginia Quarterly Review, Adroit Journal, and elsewhere. She is a two-time Pushcart nominee. In 2017, Ama was awarded a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer's Award.

Meehan Crist is writer-in-residence in biological sciences at Columbia University. Previously she was editor at large at Nautilus and reviews editor at the Believer. Her work has appeared in publications such as the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, The Nation, Tin House, Nautilus, Scientific American, and Science. Her awards include a 2015 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer's Award and fellowships from MacDowell, The Blue Mountain Center, Ucross, and Yaddo. She is the host of Convergence: a show about the future.

Kristin Dombek is the author of The Selfishness of Others: An Essay on the Fear of Narcissism (FSG, 2016). Her essays and reviews can be found in The New York Times Magazine, The Paris Review, Harper’s, Vice, and n+1, for whom she writes a philosophical advice column called The Help Desk. She is a MacDowell Fellow and the recipient of a 2013 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer's Award and a n+1 Writer’s Fellowship. Originally from Indiana, she lives in New York City, and has taught at Queens College, Queens University of Charlotte, Princeton University, and New York University.

Apricot Irving currently lives in the woods outside Portland, Oregon, but has lived in Haiti, Indonesia, and the UK. She is the recipient of a 2012 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer's Award and an Oregon Literary Arts Fellowship, and her work has appeared in Granta and on This American LifeThe Gospel of Trees (Simon & Schuster, 2018), a memoir of a missionary’s daughter in Haiti, is her first book.

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May
20
7:00 PM19:00

Mortified Portland

 

"Witness a night of adults telling stories about their lives by sharing their most mortifying childhood artifacts (diaries, letters, lyrics, poems, home movies)… in front of total strangers."

http://getmortified.com/live/

If you're looking for an evening of cathartic laughter, this reading series does not disappoint. I'll be reading mortifying teenage diary entries from the missionary compound in Haiti, and I promise there will be at least one performer who confesses to a cringe-worthy moment that you thought you were alone in remembering. Tickets still available for May 19 at 9 p.m. and May 20 at 7 p.m. at the Alberta Rose. Mortified Portland - a night to celebrate having survived adolescence.

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Mortified Portland
May
19
9:00 PM21:00

Mortified Portland

 

"Witness a night of adults telling stories about their lives by sharing their most mortifying childhood artifacts (diaries, letters, lyrics, poems, home movies)… in front of total strangers."

 

If you're looking for an evening of cathartic laughter, this reading series does not disappoint. I'll be reading mortifying teenage diary entries from the missionary compound in Haiti, and I promise there will be at least one performer who confesses to a cringe-worthy moment that you thought you were alone in remembering. Tickets still available for May 19 at 9 p.m. and May 20 at 7 p.m. at the Alberta Rose. Celebrate with us: we survived adolescence.

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Apr
27
6:30 PM18:30

Portland State University: Apricot Irving and Kristin Kaye

  • Smith Memorial Student Union, Portland State University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A shared evening with a dear friend and fellow author, to include readings from our books and a conversation that will no doubt touch on loss, trees, and the writing process with Kristin Kaye, author of "Tree Dreams," and Apricot Irving, author of "The Gospel of Trees"--at our alma mater, the Portland State University MFA program.

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Apr
26
7:00 PM19:00

A chance to hear my father talk about harvesting native seeds in Oregon

Sponsored by the Native Plant Society of Oregon, Jon Anderson will share stories and techniques for seed collection, cleaning and storage of native seeds on Thursday, April 26th from 7 to 8:45 pm in the Carnegie Room of the McMinnville Public Library, 225 NW Adams St., McMinnville. "Come if you can. I shared some good secrets at the earlier talks and I will do so again." www.jonnynativeseed.com

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Mar
8
7:30 PM19:30

Portland: Book Launch at Powell's City of Books

In her compelling new memoir, The Gospel of Trees (Simon & Schuster), Apricot Irving recounts her childhood as a missionary's daughter in Haiti during a time of upheaval – both in the country and in her home. Beautiful, poignant, and explosive, The Gospel of Trees is the story of a family crushed by ideals, and restored to kindness by honesty. Told against the backdrop of Haiti's long history of intervention, it grapples with the complicated legacy of those who wish to improve the world and bears witness to the defiant beauty of an undefeated country.

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Feb
16
11:00 AM11:00

Interview with Publisher's Weekly Radio

In this lush, emotional debut memoir, Irving tells of her life as a missionary’s daughter in Haiti. Irving was born in California, but in 1982, at age six, her parents moved her and her sisters to Haiti. Years of destructive colonization had left Haiti with severe deforestation, and her father began an ambitious mission to plant trees. Irving unflinchingly evaluates the consequences of well-meaning humanitarian work, which often included the perpetuation of oppressive colonial structures. She writes, “There is, in colonial literature, a recurring image: a foreign man, emboldened by his authority and by the lack of accountability, takes on a native mistress as a token of both his unquestioned power and his affection.” Amid the poverty in Haiti, Irving finds a “more complicated world where sorrow and beauty lived under the same leaky roof.” There, Irving wrestled with the prescriptions of her Christian beliefs, ultimately discovering a deeper faith in something else—that of beauty. “Beauty, it seemed, had been here all along: a wild summons, a name for God that did not stick in my throat.” This is a beautiful memoir that shows how a family altered by its own ambitious philanthropy might ultimately find hope in their faith and love for each other, and for Haiti. 

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